Glasgow Disability Alliance

COVID-19: We have adapted what we do and how we work during the current pandemic. Read more about GDA’s COVID-response

Publications: Reports

Supercharged: A Human Catastrophe (Summary Briefing)
Supercharged: A Human Catastrophe – Inequalities, Participation and Human Rights, before during and beyond COVID19
Dare To Dream: Future Visions (Briefing Note)

Future Visions Briefing Note

Building Connections: GDA Social Capital Report Summary

This Summary gives an overview of the findings of Assist Social Capital – for a copy of the full Report, please contact GDA.
Key Findings
By supporting disabled people as assets in and of themselves, building on skills, talents and strengths, GDA programmes connect disabled people:

to each other through peer support and learning (bonding social capital)

to other disabled people and wider communities (bridging social capital)

to resources, information, services and opportunities as well as to more powerful decision makers through partnerships and coproduction which shape policies and services (linking social capital)

Using asset based approaches, GDA delivers:

Increased connectivity – 420% amongst those surveyed in GDA’s Drivers for Change (DfC) and Purple Poncho Players (PPP) programmes.

Increased confidence, capacity and resilience to respond to the disadvantages disabled people face.

A high level of trust based on shared values and identity, ownership and control over how GDA is run, and on knowing access needs will be understood and met.

Increased participation of disabled people has led to a grassroots surge in social capital with a focus on enabling resilience and contributions.

A strong, articulate, cohesive and more resilient community of interest has been co-created as a result of investment in social connections.

Vital assets to local and national policy priorities in the form of both individual disabled people and GDA itself.

Wisdom Wit and A Whirl

Glasgow Disability Alliance (GDA) held Wisdom, Wit and a Whirl, a briefing and consultation event on the Reshaping Care for Older People (RCOP) agenda on Friday 14th June. 202 older disabled people and older people with long term health conditions attended.The event was an opportunity for the proposals to be tested with older people directly and this report summarises the views of older disabled people.
Participants generally understood the reasons for change and were in agreement with the direction of travel proposed, although there was concern that resources would be insufficient so support to older disabled people would effectively be cut.

Having a meaningful life through having purpose, choices and control, social connections and interactions, participating and making a contribution were seen as vital in keeping older people healthy and well. Older people were clear that independent living for them went beyond doing things by themselves, keeping safe from harm and physical rehabilitation- whilst these were important, they also wanted opportunities to meet people and make friends or sustain friendships, to participate, to learn, to be active including “getting out and about” and to contribute- helping others at times or simply taking part and giving their views and experiences: these are the things which keep them really well and give their lives meaning.

There was acknowledgement that support may be required to do these things and that this could take many forms e.g. with medication, with care at home, personal care and support to go out e.g. Self Directed Support, support to raise aspirations and come up with ideas since they may have lost confidence and been deprived of choices and chances to try new things or make new friends, support to organise transport or activities including learning, accessing community groups, aids and equipment and support from neighbours, friends and family. There was overwhelming consensus that older people must also be supported to have their voices heard- individually and collectively. Critically, older people believed that with the right support, they could achieve a great deal and would in turn be much healthier and well.

The collective definition of Independent Living established was not about older people doing everything by themselves in isolation but more importantly, about participating fully in life, with whatever support is needed. This is about having choices and a sense of purpose- equal to others and not “less” because they are older and disabled- having diversity, strengths and being individually valued, taking account of experience and identity, and being treated as an equal citizen with the same rights as others.

Budgeting for Equality

This report highlights the experiences and views of disabled people in relation to having their voices heard in decision making processes. Read to find out our recommendations for including disabled people in decision making.

Other formats are available from the GDA office. Phone 0141 556 7103 or email info@gdaonline.co.uk

Future Visions Summary Report

Future Visions Summary Report

Empowerment in Action

GDA’s Annual Impact Report 2016-17
Another 12 months of GDA courses, coaching, peer support, partnerships – and 529 new members! Read our annual review for a whirlwind overview of GDA’s amazing progress 2016-17.

Huge thanks to Glasgow artist Jenny Speirs for our beautiful cover illustration, and to Janice Keddie for layout and graphic design.

GDA Social Capital Evaluation – Full Report

Read the report in full, with a foreword by Angela Constance MSP, Cabinet Secretary for Communities, Social Security and Equalities.

Key Findings

By supporting disabled people as assets in and of themselves, building on skills, talents and strengths, GDA programmes connect disabled people:

  • to each other through peer support and learning (bonding social capital)
  • to other disabled people and wider communities (bridging social capital)
  • to resources, information, services and opportunities as well as to more powerful decision makers through partnerships and coproduction which shape policies and services (linking social capital)
  • Using asset based approaches, GDA delivers:
  • Increased connectivity – 420% amongst those surveyed in GDA’s Drivers for Change (DfC) and Purple Poncho Players (PPP) programmes.
  • Increased confidence, capacity and resilience to respond to the disadvantages disabled people face.
  • A high level of trust based on shared values and identity, ownership and control over how GDA is run, and on knowing access needs will be understood and met.
  • Increased participation of disabled people has led to a grassroots surge in social capital with a focus on enabling resilience and contributions.
  • A strong, articulate, cohesive and more resilient community of interest has been co-created as a result of investment in social connections.
  • Vital assets to local and national policy priorities in the form of both individual disabled people and GDA itself.
15 Rights to Independent Living

This Manifesto for Independent Living formed the basis of GDA members’ campaign to Glasgow during the last local elections, leading to Glasgow’s current Independent Living Strategy.

Available in alternative formats – downloads coming soon. If you require one now please contact us on 0141 556 7103.

Manifesto For Equal Particpation

This Manifesto maps out what needs to happen so disabled people can make our full and equal contribution to and thriving Scotland.
For a fairer Scotland, disabled people need Equal Participation.

This means we need to:

Co-produce actions to embed our rights in reality
Protect support for choice and control
Invest in connections and build resilience
Support and enable our contributions

Annual Report 2015/16

Find out what we have achieved over the past 12 months.

Key stats 2015-2016

1226 disabled learners supported from age 14-102

5885 learning opportunities–an average of 4.8 per person

655 new members engaged

Over 1700 disabled people supported to attend events

80 learning tasters delivered

16 longer term programmes

10 certificated courses completed

25 events held with and for disabled people

12 partnership events delivered

12 community clubs supported

200+ disabled people received coaching

1000+ disabled people brought together with services

15+ Peer Support networks supported

300+ website updates

1418 Facebook likes

2877 Twitter followers

8 Newsletters

12 E-Bulletins sharing learning and information

Over 100 partnerships serviced


Registered Scottish Charity number SC034247 Private Limited Company number SC248467